The MidFace Lift

Facial aging is complicated by genetics, environment, sun damage, smoking, and drinking.   There is not a single procedure that works for everyone, therefore it is important that individualized evaluation leads to an operation which is specific for that person.  The uniqueness of all faces as well as the patient’s desires may lead to a slightly different surgical approach for each individual.  Another way to say this is that the one-size-fits-all facelift has become antiquated.  To facilitate individualized care we prefer to look at each part of the face separately leading to a unique surgical treatment plan.

We divide the face into its component parts; forehead, eyes, midface, and neck with primary emphasis on the midface.  Midface aging is characterized by sagging of the facial soft tissues causing a deepening of the nasolabial folds, dark circles beneath the eyes, and the development of marionette lines from the corner of the mouth to the jaw line.  The jaw line becomes less defined as the sagging facial soft tissues drop below the mandible causing jaw line “bubble.”  In addition to the sagging soft tissues aging always involves a loss of volume and a loss skin elasticity.  It is the surgeon’s charge to address individual manifestations of aging for each component part of the face.  Elevating the soft tissues must be done and requires a specific vector or direction of elevation which may be unique for each face.  This maneuver defines the jaw line, improves the deep nasolabial folds, addresses the marionette lines, and elevates the lower eyelid skin.  This procedure is always required and must be performed accurately with minimal incisions.  Elevation of the cheek tissues is so important that it must be done under direct vision with the results being technique dependent.  The incisions are much less obvious than the old facelift scars.  While elevating the cheek and malar tissues some augmentation of the malar prominence (cheek bones) is achieved.  The need for additional volume can be affected by adding autogolous fat to the procedure.  As a rule of thumb, we rarely, if ever, remove fat from the midface but frequently add fat back to replace the soft tissues we lose over time.

The next issue to be addressed is the blending of the cheek elevation with the lower eyelids.  These procedures are typically done together; that is lower blepharoplasty and midface lift.  The elegance and effectiveness of the midface lift sets up the rejuvenation of the remaining parts of the face.

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More about Dr. Paul Howard and his Facelift Procedure

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