Laser, Light Savers, and other Fanciful Ideas

There are literally hundreds of companies developing, manufacturing, and selling laser systems to treat a wide variety of ailments. Some of these laser platforms actually work, but for the most part they never live-up to the expectations created by their marketing campaigns. There are many companies that sell the exact same technology as others but offer new “bells and whistles” as well as more attractive packaging. Doctors have a bewildering number of choices with conflicting claims of “remarkable” results. Complicating the marketplace even further is that the companies market their laser and other “do-dads” directly to the patient hoping that patient inquiries to their doctors will drive the marketplace rather than scientific studies which determine the efficacy of a specific laser treatment.

Concomitant with the latest marketing schemes a lexicon has evolved to describe the wondrous things these lasers can do. Certain words reappear frequently such as: powerful, pain-free, immediate visible results with superior comfort, fast treatment times, and the ubiquitous product that produces superior results and a great ROI (return of investment).

Besides shooting down enemy missiles (ICBM) and providing the “red dot” for laser guided weapon systems, today’s lasers are useful but not required to treat the following: tattoos, vascular skin lesions, superficial facial wrinkles, acne scarring, and for skin rejuvenation in its most generic form. It is human nature to want to look younger with no surgery, no down-time, and no pain. Unfortunately, this is rarely if ever possible. The best plan is to consult first with a physician you trust that has knowledge about Plastic Surgery and skin rejuvenation. Hopefully he or she can help you make sense of the aesthetic industry and give you useable information regarding your particular wishes. Many times a laser may not be necessary at all when much simpler explanation and recommendation will suffice. Sometimes common sense will lead you to the right answer. It is always true that a claim that is too good to be true frequently is.

There are a number of newer technologies now available that are not lasers but make fanciful claims. Intense Pulse Light (IPL), cold therapy (Zerona®), mesotherapy, and radio frequency (RF) tissue healing are out there with little to no data proving their efficacy. A very thoughtful Plastic Surgeon once said, “I’d rather not be the first to jump on the new technology band wagon, nor do I want to be the last.”

Dr. Paul Howard is Board Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. To learn more about Dr. Howard and his Plastic Surgery practice in Birmingham, Alabama please go to his web site:

www.paulhowardmd.com